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The Biology of Sharks and Rays$
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Peter A. Klimley and Steven Oerding

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226442495

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226923086.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 20 April 2021

Cartilaginous Fishes and Humans

Cartilaginous Fishes and Humans

Chapter:
(p.405) Chapter 15 Cartilaginous Fishes and Humans
Source:
The Biology of Sharks and Rays
Author(s):

A. Peter Klimley

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226923086.003.0015

This chapter discusses the interactions between the cartilaginous fishes and humans. It describes the risk of being bitten by a shark or being impaled by the barb of a stingray and the growing interest of ecologically aware tourists in viewing sharks underwater. It recounts a few infamous shark attacks to illustrate the severe economic repercussions of such a highly publicized mishap; explains the motivations behind this behavior; it also places the modest risk of shark attack in the context of many other greater risks in daily life. The chapter also considers the economic value of shark and ray ecotourism, and provides information on what species can now be viewed underwater and where to go to see them.

Keywords:   shark attacks, stingrays, ecotourism, tourist attractions

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