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Health Care Issues in the United States and Japan$
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David A. Wise and Naohiro Yashiro

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780226902920

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226903248.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Does Caregiving Affect Work? Evidence Based on Prior Labor Force Experience

Does Caregiving Affect Work? Evidence Based on Prior Labor Force Experience

Chapter:
(p.209) 9 Does Caregiving Affect Work? Evidence Based on Prior Labor Force Experience
Source:
Health Care Issues in the United States and Japan
Author(s):

Kathleen McGarry

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226903248.003.0010

This chapter explores the influence of caregiving on the labor force behavior of women. Little relationship between previous employment and later caregiving is found. Caregiving seems to be a relatively temporary state for many women. The sex distribution of siblings does not affect work behavior. It is noted that women seem to reduce on leisure rather than work when providing care to an elderly parent. The results of a multivariate analysis similarly fail to support a strong relationship between labor market ties and caregiving later in life. In addition, having a parent who needs care does not influence employment behavior, and lagged labor force participation does not affect current caregiving. The task of providing care to an elderly parent may have large negative effects on caregivers in terms of emotional well-being.

Keywords:   caregiving, labor force behavior, women, leisure, employment, elderly

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