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The Monk and the BookJerome and the Making of Christian Scholarship$
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Megan Hale Williams

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780226899008

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226899022.001.0001

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Experiments in Exegesis

Experiments in Exegesis

Chapter:
(p.63) Chapter Two Experiments in Exegesis
Source:
The Monk and the Book
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226899022.003.0003

Jerome became more willing to distance himself from his Greek sources and to emphasize his independent access to Jewish materials as his scholarly method matured. In order to represent his use of Hebrew and Jewish exegesis as a radical innovation, Jerome played down the central role of Jewish learning in Origen's own biblical scholarship—although he could not erase the connection completely, for Origen's example provided crucial legitimation for Jerome's engagement with a tradition regarded by most Christians with suspicion, if not hostility. At the same time, Jerome's mature commentaries continue to acknowledge, even to advertise, their indebtedness to Greek Christian allegorical exegesis. Jerome moved, over perhaps five to seven years, from an almost abject deference to Origen as ultimate authority, to a far more ambivalent relation to him both as a valued, but problematic source and a necessary but insufficient model.

Keywords:   Saint Jerome, Greek sources, Origen, Greek Christian allegorical exegesis, Hebrew, exegesis, biblical scholarship

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