Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's Changing Lands, Waters, and Wildlife$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Donald M. Waller and Thomas P. Rooney

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226871714

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226871745.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

Ecological Footprints of Urbanization and Sprawl: Toward a City Ethic

Ecological Footprints of Urbanization and Sprawl: Toward a City Ethic

Chapter:
(p.381) 26 Ecological Footprints of Urbanization and Sprawl: Toward a City Ethic
Source:
The Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's Changing Lands, Waters, and Wildlife
Author(s):

Dave Cieslewicz

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226871745.003.0026

This chapter argues that cities are good for the environment. Far more land is being developed in the Midwest than would be predicted based on population growth. This reflects sprawl and the continuing hunger to live on the edge of cities (often in ever larger houses). How we live on the land matters. People living in high-density urban areas typically produce far fewer air pollutants, greenhouse gases, and nonpoint water pollution than suburban and rural residents. Ironically, people who move to rural areas and the suburban fringes professing to love nature create the very sprawl they disdain. It is argued that we should extend Aldo Leopold's land ethic to incorporate a city ethic that embraces livable urban landscapes as an effective way to protect and heal the land.

Keywords:   cities, urban landscapes, urban areas, rural areas, sprawl, Aldo Leopold, land ethic, city ethic

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.