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Heidegger, Strauss, and the Premises of PhilosophyOn Original Forgetting$
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Richard L. Velkley

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780226852546

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226852553.001.0001

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Freedom from the Good

Freedom from the Good

Heidegger’s Idealist Grounding of Politics

Chapter:
Chapter 4 (p.83) Freedom from the Good
Source:
Heidegger, Strauss, and the Premises of Philosophy
Author(s):

Richard L. Velkley

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226852553.003.0004

This chapter discusses the three phases in Heidegger’s thinking as it relates to politics, namely, the analysis of human existence or Dasein, which is apolitical or at least has only implicit and rather vague political implications; the explicit political engagement with the National Socialist revolution from 1933 to around 1936, in which Heidegger sees the chance to link his philosophical efforts for spiritual renewal of the West to the dominant political forces in Germany; and the withdrawal in the middle to late 1930s from an active political approach to the overcoming of Western nihilistic technology, with the adoption of a stance of awaiting the next dispensation of Being in the arrival of new gods, as heralded by Holderlin, the poet of the German nation who speaks for Germany’s spiritual leadership of the West.

Keywords:   politics, Heidegger, Dasein, spiritual renewal of the West, nihilistic technology, Being, new gods, Holderlin

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