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Reading Leo StraussPolitics, Philosophy, Judaism$
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Steven B. Smith

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780226764023

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226763903.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 02 July 2022

Introduction

Introduction

Why Strauss, Why Now?

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Reading Leo Strauss
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226763903.003.0001

This chapter focuses on Leo Strauss, a German-Jewish émigré and the product of the pre-World War I Gymnasium. Strauss studied at several universities, finally taking his doctorate at Hamburg in 1921. He was a research assistant at an institute for Jewish research in Berlin before leaving Germany in 1932 to settle first in England and later in the United States, where he taught principally at the New School for Social Research in New York and later at the University of Chicago. It was during his period in Chicago that Strauss had his greatest influence. He was, by most accounts, a compelling teacher, and, like all good teachers, attracted students, many of whom came to regard themselves as part of a distinctive school. By the time of his death in 1973, Strauss had written more than a dozen books and around one hundred articles and reviews.

Keywords:   Leo Strauss, Berlin, World War I, German-Jewish émigré, Chicago, University of Chicago

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