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The Key of GreenPassion and Perception in Renaissance Culture$
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Bruce R. Smith

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226763781

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226763811.001.0001

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Green Spectacles

Green Spectacles

Chapter:
(p.125) Chapter Four Green Spectacles
Source:
The Key of Green
Author(s):

Bruce R. Smith

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226763811.003.0005

This chapter examines the implications of pre-Cartesian psychology specifically for looking. Horace's famous line “ut pictura poesis” (as painting, so is poetry) in “Ars Poetica” provides the occasion for looking at the varying relationships between seeing and wording in several set pieces of ekphrasis—accounts of creation in Genesis and Ovid's Metamorphoses, Britomart's rescue of Amoret from the House of Busyrane in Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene, the painted destruction of Troy in William Shakespeare's Lucrece, and Richard Crashaw's instructions to the painter in “The Flaming Heart”—as well as in a series of tapestries woven by the Sheldon workshops between 1590 and 1615 and in a rare surviving set of painted cloths at Owlpen Manor, Gloucestershire.

Keywords:   psychology, Horace, seeing, wording, ekphrasis, painting, Richard Crashaw, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Ovid

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