Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Madison's NightmareHow Executive Power Threatens American Democracy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter M. Shane

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780226749396

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226749426.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 February 2021

Recovering the Madisonian Dream: Visions of Democracy, Steps to Reform

Recovering the Madisonian Dream: Visions of Democracy, Steps to Reform

Chapter:
(p.175) 7 Recovering the Madisonian Dream: Visions of Democracy, Steps to Reform
Source:
Madison's Nightmare
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226749426.003.0007

This chapter contrasts the models of democracy and the rule of law embedded in presidentialism and its more appealing counterpart, constitutional pluralism. It presents a series of concrete steps that Americans can take to reassert the vigor of checks and balances and curb the extreme presidentialism that the perfect storm has wrought. Since 1981, American democracy has been hit by something of a “perfect storm.” Most Americans regard democracy as the foundational principle of government legitimacy. Under the theory of presidentialism, it is the election of Presidents that most critically establishes both sides of democratic legitimacy. America needs to address the political and institutional contexts that have enabled and promoted the spirit of faction-ridden government that James Madison decried. It is noted that anything that would make Americans more knowledgeable, more tolerant, and more confident in the future would likely enhance the democracy.

Keywords:   American democracy, rule of law, presidentialism, checks, balances, constitutional pluralism, government legitimacy, democratic legitimacy

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.