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BigLawMoney and Meaning in the Modern Law Firm$
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Mitt Regan and Lisa H. Rohrer

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226741949

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226742274.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 17 May 2022

Encouraging Entrepreneurs

Encouraging Entrepreneurs

Chapter:
(p.54) 3 Encouraging Entrepreneurs
Source:
BigLaw
Author(s):

Mitt Regan

Lisa H. Rohrer

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226742274.003.0004

Stagnant demand for law firm services and the attenuation of long-term client relationships place pressure on law firms to take steps to ensure that they have a steady stream of work. This leads them to emphasize to their lawyers that they must be entrepreneurial, in the sense that they must be constantly alert to opportunities for new work from both new and existing clients. It also requires that lawyers stay busy so that they can demonstrate that they are generating sufficient revenues to be regarded as productive. The demand to be entrepreneurial requires that partners engage in "identity work" to develop an understanding of themselves that incorporates this characteristic in a coherent conception of themselves as a lawyer. This can be done in a way that either changes one's understanding of oneself as a professional, or that reconciles this characteristic with traditional professional values. The chapter describes how the demand to be entrepreneurial can be especially challenging for women because they may not have as much access as men to partners with influential client relationships, or may not be regarded as possessing attributes that warrant giving them responsibility for such relationships.

Keywords:   entrepreneurial, lawyer productivity, identity work, women in law firms

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