Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Nature's MirrorHow Taxidermists Shaped America's Natural History Museums and Saved Endangered Species$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mary Anne Andrei

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226730318

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226730455.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 26 May 2022

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Nature's Mirror
Author(s):

Mary Anne Andrei

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226730455.003.0001

The taxidermists who trained at Ward’s Natural Science Establishment in Rochester, New York, in the 1870s and 1880s, formed a uniquely important cohort of “museum men” and early conservationists. William Hornaday, Carl Akeley, along with their lesser known colleagues Frederic Lucas, Charles Townsend, and Frederic Webster revolutionized the world of museum display and permanently reshaped the public’s understanding of the natural world. Their work led to the creation of America’s major zoos and laid the foundations of the modern wildlife conservation movement. The new taxidermy of the nineteenth century owed a debt to the taxidermists and preservationists who came before them. It wasn’t until the 1800s that methods had progressed enough to set a lasting standard for the preservation of natural history collections. It was on this foundation that taxidermists of Ward’s were able to innovate methods of public display that emphasized accurate anatomy and aesthetic design that portrayed life and action. Their wildlife exhibits were meant to capture the interest and attention of the public to educate them about species and their habitats, and in many instances raise awareness of the devastating effects of careless human interaction with the natural world.

Keywords:   Ward’s Natural Science Establishment, William T. Hornaday, Carl Akeley, Frederic Lucas, Charles Townsend, Frederic Webster, taxidermy, wildlife preservation, wildlife conservation, exhibits

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.