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The Rape of MesopotamiaBehind the Looting of the Iraq Museum$
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Lawrence Rothfield

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780226729459

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226729435.001.0001

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“Nobody Thought of Culture”: War-Related Heritage Protection in the Early Prewar Period

“Nobody Thought of Culture”: War-Related Heritage Protection in the Early Prewar Period

Chapter:
(p.21) Two “Nobody Thought of Culture”: War-Related Heritage Protection in the Early Prewar Period
Source:
The Rape of Mesopotamia
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226729435.003.0003

This chapter discusses the war-related protection of cultural heritage prior to the 2003 Iraq invasion. It suggests that the looting of the National Museum of Iraq in Baghdad stemmed from the failure of the U.S. military to prepare adequately for the postcombat phase of the 2003 war. The chapter also mentions that the archaeological and cultural heritage community was structurally unprepared to work with postcombat planners as the war clouds began to gather in the spring and summer of 2002.

Keywords:   cultural heritage, looting, 2003 Iraq invasion, National Museum, Baghdad, U.S. military, archaeological community, postcombat planning

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