Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Steam CityRailroads, Urban Space, and Corporate Capitalism in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Schley

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226720258

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226720395.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 24 June 2022

Tracks in the Streets

Tracks in the Streets

Chapter:
(p.40) 2 Tracks in the Streets
Source:
Steam City
Author(s):
David Schley
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226720395.003.0003

The citizens of Baltimore largely supported the B&O at its inception, but public consensus soon fractured as Baltimoreans faced, for the first time in history, the question of how to integrate railroad facilities with urban space. This chapter looks at the engineering and political challenges involved in embedding the infrastructure of long-distance communications within the urban environment. Railroad trains, with their fixed paths and frictionless movement, fit uneasily in an urban streetscape characterized by ad hoc traffic patterns. The decision in the 1830s to place railroad tracks in the center of major city thoroughfares prompted questions about urban mobility, the right to the city, and corporate power.

Keywords:   infrastructure, urban space, mobility, traffic, streets, slavery, monopoly, municipal government

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.