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The Problem with Feeding CitiesThe Social Transformation of Infrastructure, Abundance, and Inequality in America$
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Andrew Deener

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226702919

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226702919.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 02 December 2021

The Problem with Feeding Cities

The Problem with Feeding Cities

Chapter:
(p.239) Eight The Problem with Feeding Cities
Source:
The Problem with Feeding Cities
Author(s):

Andrew Deener

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226702919.003.0008

This chapter asks, how does the infrastructural approach to the transformation of the food system force us to reconsider how we think about feeding cities, solving social problems, and addressing inequalities in health outcomes? It argues that explanations of the urban order require closer attention to infrastructure as the material basis of abundance, convenience, and inequality. It draws out lessons, abstracted from the range of examples throughout the book, to better understand how the food system has changed and why such changes led to collective consequences. It focuses on three interrelated themes: infrastructural uncertainty; permeating market technologies; and the unintended consequences of system transformation.

Keywords:   infrastructural uncertainty, market technologies, unintended consequences, social problems, infrastructural power

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