Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Science Periodicals in Nineteenth-Century BritainConstructing Scientific Communities$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gowan Dawson, Bernard Lightman, Sally Shuttleworth, and Jonathan R. Topham

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226676517

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226683461.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 25 June 2022

“The Sympathy of a Crowd”: Imagining Scientific Communities in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Entomology Periodicals

“The Sympathy of a Crowd”: Imagining Scientific Communities in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Entomology Periodicals

Chapter:
(p.205) Chapter 6 “The Sympathy of a Crowd”: Imagining Scientific Communities in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Entomology Periodicals
Source:
Science Periodicals in Nineteenth-Century Britain
Author(s):

Matthew Wale

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226683461.003.0007

This chapter is a case study of the Entomologist's Weekly Intelligencer (1856-61), the first weekly natural-history periodical, which was dedicated to the subject of collecting and studying insects. Edited by the entomologist Henry Tibbats Stainton (1822-92), the content of this periodical almost entirely consisted of published letters written by insect collectors from around Britain, sharing news of the species they had captured or observed in their localities. As Stainton intended, the Intelligencer provided a far more efficient means of communication than the more established medium of personal correspondence, as a single letter could be printed and distributed to "every entomologist in the kingdom." Furthermore, the periodical enabled readers and contributors to imagine themselves as part of a wider entomological community based on the exchange of information and specimens. The individual members of this community varied considerably in their personal circumstances, including both wealthy gentlemen, such as Stainton himself, and working-class naturalists. This chapter demonstrates how the Intelligencer enabled these diverse individuals to engage with each other in ways that were scientifically productive, despite their differences. It therefore challenges key historiographical assumptions regarding scientific participation in mid-nineteenth-century Britain.

Keywords:   natural history, entomology, imagined community, correspondence, popular science, Henry Tibbats Stainton, Entomologist's Weekly Intelligencer

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.