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Bankrupt in AmericaA History of Debtors, Their Creditors, and the Law in the Twentieth Century$
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Mary Eschelbach Hansen and Bradley A. Hansen

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226679563

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226679730.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One Introduction
Source:
Bankrupt in America
Author(s):

Mary Eschelbach Hansen

Bradley A. Hansen

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226679730.003.0001

The introduction acquaints the reader with what is already known about bankruptcy in the twentieth century, describes the methods used in the book, and previews the central argument. The chapter begins with a broad overview of the laws and procedures governing the collection of unpaid debt at the state and describes federal bankruptcy. The text highlights the interplay between state and federal law. It introduces the interdisciplinary literature on bankruptcy, emphasizing the need for an analytic framework that integrates the story of changes in the bankruptcy law with the story of changes in the bankruptcy rate. It places the framework and methods within the contexts of New Institutional and cliometric traditions.

Keywords:   cliometrics, new institutional economics, path dependence, collection law, bankruptcy procedure

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