Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Genres of the Credit EconomyMediating Value in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Britain$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mary Poovey

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226675329

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226675213.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 07 April 2020

Professional Political Economy and Its Popularizers

Professional Political Economy and Its Popularizers

Chapter:
(p.219) Chapter Four Professional Political Economy and Its Popularizers
Source:
Genres of the Credit Economy
Author(s):
Mary Poovey
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226675213.003.0007

This chapter argues that, during the middle decades of the nineteenth century, writing about economic and financial matters, which was increasingly distributed across specialized professions and circulated in a variety of publications, was as instrumental as monetary instruments in helping naturalize—and, thus, promote—the growth of Britain's credit economy. Writers who discussed the economy continued to perform the mediating function eighteenth-century writers initiated. As they did so, they also helped manage the problematic of representation, which repeatedly threatened to become visible whenever disturbing events roiled the British economy.

Keywords:   writing, economic theory, credit economy, British economy, representation

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.