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Genres of the Credit EconomyMediating Value in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Britain$
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Mary Poovey

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226675329

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226675213.001.0001

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Preamble Mediating Genres

Preamble Mediating Genres

Chapter:
(p.25) Preamble Mediating Genres
Source:
Genres of the Credit Economy
Author(s):
Mary Poovey
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226675213.003.0002

This preamble provides an overview of the three genres emerging from the generic differentiation process: imaginative genres, financial writing, and monetary genres. The three forms of writing are separated into three distinct groups because our modern disciplines do so; the kinds of writing that appear in each group are described in terms of each other, instead of in relation to all the other kinds, because this is the way that modern disciplines generally understand generic affiliation. The chapter emphasizes the incommensurability of these genres, which a historical perspective enables us to see, rather than the homologies that a theoretical perspective might highlight, because variations that were once social or functional have now come to seem essential or definitive.

Keywords:   modern discipline, generic affiliation, imaginative genres, financial writing, monetary genres

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