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The Theory of EvolutionPrinciples, Concepts, and Assumptions$
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Samuel M. Scheiner and David P. Mindell

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226671024

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226671338.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 29 November 2021

The Inductive Theory of Natural Selection

The Inductive Theory of Natural Selection

Chapter:
(p.171) Nine The Inductive Theory of Natural Selection
Source:
The Theory of Evolution
Author(s):

Steven A. Frank

Gordon A. Fox

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226671338.003.0009

The theory of natural selection has two forms. Deductive theory describes how populations change over time. One starts with an initial population and some rules for change. From those assumptions, one calculates the future state of the population. Deductive theory predicts how populations adapt to environmental challenge. Inductive theory describes the causes of change in populations. One starts with a given amount of change. One then assigns different parts of the total change to particular causes. Inductive theory analyzes alternative causal models for how populations have adapted to environmental challenge. This chapter emphasizes the inductive analysis of cause.

Keywords:   causal analysis, inductive theory, deductive theory, prediction, explanation, natural selection

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