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Uncivil RightsTeachers, Unions, and Race in the Battle for School Equity$
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Jonna Perrillo

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780226660714

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226660738.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Uncivil Rights
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226660738.003.0001

It is essential to understand the connection between teacher professionalism and civil rights to grasp fully the what is central to the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation that not only has an impact on the shape of public education in the United States, but also has influenced federal government intervention in public education since 1960. This book looks at the historical relationship between two social movements and these are studied separately, that is, the struggle of teachers for professional agency and the curiosity for an equal education by black Americans. The Teachers Guild and the United Federation of Teachers (UFT) developed a strategy towards that which was focused on insulating teachers from the demands of civil rights. This book thus, attempts to examine the union agendas formed by leaders and the ways in which teachers influence these agendas.

Keywords:   No Child Left Behind, NCLB, teacher, civil rights, public education, Teachers Guild, United Federation of Teachers, UFT

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