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Move On UpChicago Soul Music and Black Cultural Power$
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Aaron Cohen

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226176079

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226653174.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 26 June 2022

We’re a Winner: Musicians, Activists, and Educators Build an Expanding Industry

We’re a Winner: Musicians, Activists, and Educators Build an Expanding Industry

Chapter:
(p.42) Three We’re a Winner: Musicians, Activists, and Educators Build an Expanding Industry
Source:
Move On Up
Author(s):

Aaron Cohen

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226653174.003.0004

While black executives rose up in such large record companies as Brunswick during the mid to late 1960s, musicians and music media responded to Martin Luther King and Operation Breadbasket’s growing emphasis on northern cities, especially Chicago. WVON served as a connector among the music, its audience and the wider movement. At the same time, music educators like James Mack showed young artists how learning different idioms, particularly classical music, can be a path toward their own artistic empowerment. Musicians like Curtis Mayfield also sought to establish self sufficiency through establishing artist-owned enterprises, like his own Curtom Records. Other artists, such as the Chess Records session musicians, asserted themselves within that company’s organizational hierarchy and through their own music.

Keywords:   Brunswick Records, Martin Luther King, Operation Breadbasket, James Mack, classical music, Curtom Records, Chess Records

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