Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Foreign Policy DisconnectWhat Americans Want from Our Leaders but Don't Get$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Benjamin I. Page and Marshall M. Bouton

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780226644615

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226644592.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Friends and Foes in the World

Friends and Foes in the World

Chapter:
(p.74) Chapter Three Friends and Foes in the World
Source:
The Foreign Policy Disconnect
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226644592.003.0004

This chapter uses data from the 2002 and 2004 Chicago Council on Foreign Relations surveys to explore the positive or negative feelings that Americans express toward many different foreign countries and foreign leaders. It also looks at earlier surveys to examine how such feelings have changed over a thirty-year period, finding that when major events occur, feelings about the particular countries involved tend to be adjusted accordingly, but that otherwise they generally have been rather stable. The chapter goes on to analyze how individuals' feelings about foreign countries and leaders are affected by their personal characteristics (especially their levels of formal education and their religious affiliations); their ideological and partisan attitudes (particularly their internationalism, or belief that the United States should take an “active part” in the world); and their knowledge of world affairs.

Keywords:   Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, Americans, public opinion, foreign countries, foreign leaders, world affairs, internationalism

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.