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Black WaveHow Networks and Governance Shaped Japan's 3/11 Disasters$
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Daniel P. Aldrich

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226638263

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226638577.001.0001

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Prefectural Level: Networks Making a Difference

Prefectural Level: Networks Making a Difference

Chapter:
(p.102) Four Prefectural Level: Networks Making a Difference
Source:
Black Wave
Author(s):

Daniel P. Aldrich

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226638577.003.0004

Shifting one step up from cities, Chapter 4 investigates the three prefectures most affected by the 3/11 disasters: Fukushima, Miyagi, and Iwate (known in Japanese as the Tōhoku sanken). Some prefectures built strong social networks with external and domestic NGOs and organizations, which accelerated their recoveries; others did not. Fukushima, host of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, continues to struggle. Choices made by administrators and politicians in Miyagi and Iwate Prefectures also influenced the trajectory of their recoveries. Prefectural administrators often made suggestions to local governments based on central government recommendations that they interpreted as mandates, narrowing the options for reconstruction projects and reducing local autonomy in the process. At this level of analysis, local social networks mattered less than prefectural governance.

Keywords:   Prefecture, Social networks, External organizations, NGOs, governance

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