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HomeschoolingThe History and Philosophy of a Controversial Practice$
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James G. Dwyer and Shawn F. Peters

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226627113

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226627397.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 07 December 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Past, Present, and Future in the Real World

Chapter:
(p.225) Conclusion
Source:
Homeschooling
Author(s):

James G. Dwyer

Shawn F. Peters

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226627397.003.0009

Homeschooling in America has come almost full circle. The rise of public schools and proliferation of compulsory schooling laws made homeschooling for nearly a century something aberrational and requiring defense. But today it is again, as it was in the colonial era, something quite familiar, even if it is today practiced by a far smaller percentage of the population. What is dramatically different today, relative to the colonial era, are the educational demands that the modern economy and contemporary social and civic life impose, which make it much more likely that homeschooling today will be inadequate, in terms of what the state views as in each child’s best interests, despite the best of parental intentions. Our conclusion lays out our normative analysis given the history and philosophical considerations concerning homeschooling.

Keywords:   normative analysis, homeschooling, state oversight

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