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Social Security Programs and Retirement around the WorldWorking Longer$
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Courtney C. Coile, Kevin Milligan, and David A. Wise

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226619293

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226619323.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 07 December 2021

Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Japan

Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Japan

Chapter:
(p.163) 7 Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Japan
Source:
Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World
Author(s):

Takashi Oshio

Emiko Usui

Satoshi Shimizutani

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226619323.003.0008

Japan experienced increases in labor force participation (LFP) of the elderly in recent years, as have other advanced countries. In the present study, we overview the employment trend of the elderly in Japan, and examine what factors have contributed to its increase since the early 2000s. Improved health and longevity, increasing education levels, and a shift towards less physically demanding jobs have allowed the elderly to stay longer in the labor force. However, elderly employment rebound and its timing are more closely linked to changes in social security incentives, especially increases in the eligibility age for public pension benefits. More broadly, reduced generosity in social security programs since the mid-1980s has been a key driver of the long-term trend change in elderly employment. A series of social security reforms have helped utilize the elderly’s potential work capacity, accumulated due to improving health conditions and other favorable factors for LFP in the elderly.

Keywords:   elderly employment, labor force participation, option value, social security programs, Japan

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