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Social Security Programs and Retirement around the WorldWorking Longer$
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Courtney C. Coile, Kevin Milligan, and David A. Wise

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226619293

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226619323.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 07 July 2022

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
(p.iii) Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World
Author(s):

Courtney C. Coile

Kevin Milligan

David A. Wise

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226619323.003.0001

This is the eighth phase of a project on social security and retirement that compares the experiences of a dozen developed countries. The project was launched in the mid-1990s following decades of declining labor force participation rates of older men. The first several phases document that social security program provisions can create powerful incentives for retirement that are strongly correlated with the labor force behavior of older workers. Subsequent project phases have explored disability program provisions and their effects on retirement as well as potential obstacles to promoting work at older ages, including whether there is a link between older employment and youth unemployment and whether older individuals are healthy enough to work longer. Since the project began, the decline in men’s labor force participation has ended and been replaced by sharply rising participation rates. Older women’s participation has been rising as well. In this volume, we explore this phenomenon of working longer. We document trends in participation and employment and consider factors that may explain these changes. We conclude that social security reforms as well as other factors such as the movement of women into the labor force have likely played an important role.

Keywords:   labor force participation, health, employment, retirement, mortality

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