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Michael Polanyi and His GenerationOrigins of the Social Construction of Science$
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Mary Jo Nye

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780226610634

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226610658.001.0001

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SSK, Constructivism, and the Paradoxical Legacy Of Polanyi and the 1930s Generation

SSK, Constructivism, and the Paradoxical Legacy Of Polanyi and the 1930s Generation

Chapter:
(p.295) EPILOGUE SSK, Constructivism, and the Paradoxical Legacy Of Polanyi and the 1930s Generation
Source:
Michael Polanyi and His Generation
Author(s):

Mary Jo Nye

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226610658.003.0010

This chapter focuses on David Edge, who, among the three founding generations in the social epistemology of science, was a member of the transitional second generation in Great Britain. Edge helped establish the Edinburgh program in sociology of scientific knowledge, which became known as SSK. In discussing the origins of the program, he later noted the impact in Great Britain of the kind of argument which Derek de Solla Price was making about big science, as well as the view of Manchester's Lord Bowden that limitations had to be made on scientific growth. That argument was countered immediately by J. D. Bernal, then in his sixties, who suggested in the New Scientist that scientific specialties with the fastest rising curves of growth should be funded as generously as possible.

Keywords:   founding generations, David Edge, social epistemology, science, Edinburgh program, scientific knowledge, SSK, de Solla Price, Lord Bowden, J. D. Bernal

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