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The Browning of the New South$
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Jennifer A. Jones

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226600840

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226601038.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 October 2020

Introduction: Race Relations and Demographic Change

Introduction: Race Relations and Demographic Change

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction: Race Relations and Demographic Change
Source:
The Browning of the New South
Author(s):

Jennifer A. Jones

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226601038.003.0001

This chapter introduces the issue of increasing demographic change in the U.S. South and considers how such change is impacting race relations and racial formation in the region. Prevailing views on race relations suggest that intergroup hostility and competition would be the norm, especially between blacks and Latinos. In Winston-Salem North Carolina, however, and throughout the region, blacks and Latinos are increasingly building coalitions and social ties. To examine this unexpected outcome, Chapter 1 looks to the race and immigration literatures to theorize how race is made and lived in the Winston-Salem context. This chapter lays out the mixed qualitative methods methodological approach and makes the overarching argument that how Latino newcomers are incorporated, and the dynamic nature of incorporation, both play an important role in shaping the racialization process.

Keywords:   race relations, demographic change, immigration, Latinos, U.S. South, politics, Winston-Salem, ethnography, qualitative methods

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