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Engineering the Eternal CityInfrastructure, Topography, and the Culture of Knowledge in Late Sixteenth-Century Rome$
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Pamela O. Long

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780226543796

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226591315.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 27 June 2022

The Streets and Sewers of Rome

The Streets and Sewers of Rome

Chapter:
(p.43) 2 The Streets and Sewers of Rome
Source:
Engineering the Eternal City
Author(s):

Pamela O. Long

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226591315.003.0003

This chapter concerns the streets and sewers of fifteenth and sixteenth century Rome. It traces two centuries of papal bulls concerning the masters of the streets and their responsibilities, including street cleaning. It discusses the laws which allowed property owners to force their neighbors to sell their property to them for their own palace expansion. It itemizes the functioning sewers in the late sixteenth century and provides a history of one of them, the Chiavica di San Silvestro. It argues that sanitation issues in Rome were characteristic of early modern rather than modern cities and that sanitation efforts failed as a whole for structural reasons.

Keywords:   masters of the streets, sewage, street cleaning, Roman property laws, Chiavica di San Silvestro, Pope Pius IV, Pope Gregory XIII, Pope Sixtus V, Roman streets, Marc Antonio Bardo

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