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Guerrilla MarketingCounterinsurgency and Capitalism in Colombia$
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Alexander L. Fattal

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780226590509

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226590783.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 30 July 2021

Target Intimacy

Target Intimacy

September 2016

Chapter:
(p.229) Epilogue Target Intimacy
Source:
Guerrilla Marketing
Author(s):

Alexander L. Fattal

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226590783.003.0013

The epilogue ruminates on the FARC’s final guerrilla conference in the Plains of Yarí, an event that led journalists to snark about “FARC in the park,” or “FARC Woodstock.” There the author was confronted with a senior member of the government’s demobilization program on secretive official business. He spoke about the impending demobilization of the FARC’s military structures and speculated that FARC fighters would abandon their political commitments to reconnect with family. Intimacy was again being conceived as a battleground. The epilogue places this continuity in relation to a parallel trend in which marketers construct an intimate, loving relationship between people and products. The convergence of militarism and marketing posited by Guerrilla Marketing comes into relief in a demobilization poster that camouflages itself as a Revlon advertisement — a flawed, deeply gendered effort to sell demobilization to female guerrillas. The epilogue points to the limitations of branding as a form of affective governance, shortcomings that surged to the fore in the plebiscite of October 2, 2016, when Colombians narrowly rejected an initial peace accord. The No campaign had out-marketed the Yes campaign (which featured the work of Lowe/SSP3) and severely hobbled the possibilities for a lasting peace in Colombia.

Keywords:   FARC conference, target intimacy, love and branding, demobilization and gender, peace plebiscite

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