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Savages, Romans, and DespotsThinking about Others from Montaigne to Herder$
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Robert Launay

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780226575254

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226575421.001.0001

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Distant Relations: The Jesuits in New France

Distant Relations: The Jesuits in New France

Chapter:
(p.84) Six Distant Relations: The Jesuits in New France
Source:
Savages, Romans, and Despots
Author(s):

Robert Launay

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226575421.003.0006

For much of the seventeenth century, the Jesuits enjoyed monopoly over missions in New France, the French possessions in Canada, particularly Quebec. They published an annual series of Jesuit Relations, accounts of Native Americans and their attempts to convert them. Notably, Paul Le Jeune, the first superior, published an account of an expedition accompanying a hunting band of Montagnais (Innu). Other detailed accounts include Jean de Brebeuf’s mission to the Huron (Wendat). In the eighteenth century, Lafitau published a treatise comparing “American Savages”, particularly the Iroquois among whom he had worked, to Ancient Greeks and Romans, suggesting that the matrilineal Iroquois were actually descendants of the Lycians described by Herodotus.

Keywords:   Jesuits, Canada, Quebec, Montagnais, Huron, Iroquois, Paul Le Jeune, Jean de Brebeuf, Lafitau

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