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Animal IntimaciesInterspecies Relatedness in India's Central Himalayas$
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Radhika Govindrajan

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780226559841

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226560045.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2019

Pig Gone Wild Colonialism, Conservation, and the Otherwild

Pig Gone Wild Colonialism, Conservation, and the Otherwild

Chapter:
(p.119) 5 Pig Gone Wild Colonialism, Conservation, and the Otherwild
Source:
Animal Intimacies
Author(s):

Radhika Govindrajan

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226560045.003.0005

This chapter follows the story of an experimental pig who escaped from the IVRI, a livestock research institution established by the colonial state, in the 1960s and is said to have lived out the rest of her life in the adjoining forest. Many villagers believe that the runaway pig is an ancestor of the numerous wild boar who roam the forests in this region today. As such, they argue that contemporary conservation practices ignore the ways in which the entanglement of people's lives with wild pigs is the outcome of the distinctive history of an individual animal who linked people, animals, and institutions in unexpected ways. The chapter examines the ways in which the runaway pig's history of escape and subsequent rewilding reconfigures, unsettles, and exceeds the ways in which categories such as the "wild" and the "animal" buttress intersecting projects of colonial, caste, and species difference and power in the region.

Keywords:   conservation, wildness, caste, animality, domestication

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