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Wading Right InDiscovering the Nature of Wetlands$
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Catherine Owen Koning and Sharon M. Ashworth

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226554211

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226554495.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Wet Meadows: Not Too Dry, Not Too Wet

Wet Meadows: Not Too Dry, Not Too Wet

Chapter:
(p.41) Chapter 2 Wet Meadows: Not Too Dry, Not Too Wet
Source:
Wading Right In
Author(s):

Catherine Owen Koning

Sharon M. Ashworth

Catherine Owen Koning

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226554495.003.0003

The authors’ own adventures in wetland research give the reader a feel for traversing a wet meadow before the chapter presents an overview of the ecology of wet meadows. Such wetlands, if undisturbed, are dominated by sedges and often do not have standing water for a good portion of the growing season. Wet meadows can contribute substantially to downstream water quality and flood control. Highlighted in the chapter are the tussock sedge as ecosystem engineer and two invasive species, purple loosestrife and reed canary grass. The life history of each of these species illustrates the incredible adaptations wetland plants utilize to tolerate the variable and harsh conditions of life in a wetland.

Keywords:   wet meadow, sedge, water quality, purple loosestrife, reed canary grass, ecosystem engineer, tussock, invasive species

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