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A Land of Milk and ButterHow Elites Created the Modern Danish Dairy Industry$
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Markus Lampe and Paul Sharp

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226549507

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226549644.001.0001

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How the Danes Discovered Britain

How the Danes Discovered Britain

Chapter:
(p.131) 7 How the Danes Discovered Britain
Source:
A Land of Milk and Butter
Author(s):

Markus Lampe

Paul Sharp

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226549644.003.0007

Increasing the quality and quantity of produce was eventually to be mostly stimulated by demand from abroad, particularly the industrializing cities of northern England. We introduce in this chapter a new set of elites, the merchants who helped establish connections with first Hamburg and later the United Kingdom. Through the collection of available trade data, we explain how the loss of the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein in 1864 marked a sudden break in terms of the reorientation of Danish trade towards the UK. This was partly because the trade hub of Hamburg became politically unacceptable, but we use information on prices to demonstrate that the Danish and British markets for butter were integrated even before that date. Moreover, the advantages of exporting via Hamburg were already diminishing before 1864, and although the loss of the duchies provided the final impetus for the trade reorientation, there were movements in this direction even prior to this.

Keywords:   market integration, merchants, trade, market discovery

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