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Aesthetics at LargeVolume 1: Art, Ethics, Politics$
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Thierry de Duve

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780226546568

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226546872.001.0001

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The Post-Duchamp Condition

The Post-Duchamp Condition

Remarks on Four Usages of the Word Art

Chapter:
(p.39) 3 The Post-Duchamp Condition
Source:
Aesthetics at Large
Author(s):

Thierry de Duve

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226546872.003.0004

Duchamp, often thought to have been the agent of the passage from the Beaux-Arts to the Art-in-General system, is here seen as merely its messenger. The arrival of his “message” in the 1960s has belatedly forced the discipline of aesthetics (or theory of art) to make room for four usages of the word “art”: the aforementioned Art-in-General, which describes the art world we presently live in; art as such, which qualifies the affective purview of the aesthetic experience of art; art altogether, which establishes the (ideal) basis of comparison for art; and art itself, which is the regulative idea resulting from the mapping of feelings (art as such) onto things (art altogether). This idea is here interpreted in Kantian rather than Platonic or, more importantly, Hegelian terms.

Keywords:   art altogether, art as such, art itself, Art-in-General, G.W.F. Hegel, Immanuel Kant, Marcel Duchamp

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