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The Moral NeoliberalWelfare and Citizenship in Italy$
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Andrea Muehlebach

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780226545394

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226545417.001.0001

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Five an Age Full of Virtue

Five an Age Full of Virtue

Chapter:
(p.136) Five an Age Full of Virtue
Source:
The Moral Neoliberal
Author(s):

Andrea Muehlebach

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226545417.003.0005

This chapter tracks the ways in which the moral neoliberal is differentially extracted from across the generational spectrum, as public opinion construes the elderly as a privileged locus of publicly valuable affect and action. It shows that the moral neoliberal finds its paradigmatic expression in a segment of the population that law and other public interventions figure as wealthy in both material and temporal senses, and which can therefore be cast as continually obliged to society in ways that younger generations cannot. The transformation of retirees from social into ethical citizens relies on a dual strategy that draws first and foremost on the public cultivation of a sense that pensioners are socially positioned as a leisure class, “owning” an excess of time that ought to be socially redistributed.

Keywords:   moral neoliberal, public opinion, paradigmatic expression, younger generation, retirees, social citizens, ethical citizens

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