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Merce CunninghamAfter the Arbitrary$
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Carrie Noland

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780226541105

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226541389.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

The Ethnics of Vaudeville, the Rhythms of Roaratorio

The Ethnics of Vaudeville, the Rhythms of Roaratorio

Chapter:
(p.146) (6) The Ethnics of Vaudeville, the Rhythms of Roaratorio
Source:
Merce Cunningham
Author(s):

Carrie Noland

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226541389.003.0007

This chapter seeks to complicate the critical consensus that Cunningham produced only "neutral" movement stripped of all (personal, cultural, and historical) connotations.Cunningham worked through the problem of ethnic/racial difference by exploring difference as it is manifested in rhythmic forms. I look at two works that self-consciously index popular dances resonant with troubled histories: Antic Meet (1958) and Roaratorio (1983). In conclusion, I turn to Bill T. Jones's Story/Time (2012), a dance that uses Cage’s method of “indeterminacy” and thereby draws out the less-than-neutral valences of Cunningham's experimental practice.

Keywords:   difference, rhythmic forms, Antic Mee, Roaratorio, Bill T. Jones, Story/Time, indeterminacy, less-than-neutral, connotations

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