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Women Working LongerIncreased Employment at Older Ages$
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Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780226532509

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226532646.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 19 May 2022

Teaching, Teachers’ Pensions, and Retirement across Recent Cohorts of College-Graduate Women

Teaching, Teachers’ Pensions, and Retirement across Recent Cohorts of College-Graduate Women

Chapter:
(p.217) 7 Teaching, Teachers’ Pensions, and Retirement across Recent Cohorts of College-Graduate Women
Source:
Women Working Longer
Author(s):

Maria D. Fitzpatrick

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226532646.003.0008

Labor force participation rates of college-educated women ages 60 to 64 increased by 20 percent (10 percentage points) between 2000 and 2010. One potential explanation for this change stems from the fact that fewer college-educated women in the more recent cohorts were ever teachers. This occupational shift could affect the length of women’s careers because teaching is a profession where workers are covered by defined benefit pensions and, generally, defined benefit pensions allow workers to retire earlier than Social Security. I provide evidence supporting the hypothesis and show that older college-educated women who worked as teachers do not experience increases in labor force participation as large as their counterparts who never taught.

Keywords:   retirement, pensions, teachers, female labor supply

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