Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Political Economy of PipelinesA Century of Comparative Institutional Development$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jeff D. Makholm

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780226502106

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226502120.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

The Competitive Potential for the World's Pipeline Systems

The Competitive Potential for the World's Pipeline Systems

Chapter:
(p.153) Chapter Eight The Competitive Potential for the World's Pipeline Systems
Source:
The Political Economy of Pipelines
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226502120.003.0008

This chapter investigates whether the efficient Coasian market in rights enjoyed by the US gas industry has any chance of developing in other pipeline markets, and analyzes the stunted nature of gas commodity markets in Europe and Australia. The absence of Coasian bargaining in Canadian pipeline transport rights probably affected the gas prices at various locations across Canada. The UK government and its regulators focused on lowering the entry barriers to gas marketers. Australia would seem to have the structural basis for a competitive gas market. In general, the EU worked on the institutions that: govern the way its pipelines are regulated; transact with customers; facilitate or impede the growth of a competitive gas market; and promote the security of its gas supplies without resorting to redundant pipelines and complex political maneuverings.

Keywords:   pipeline markets, Coasian market, US gas industry, Australia, Canada, UK government, gas market

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.