Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Universalism without UniformityExplorations in Mind and Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Julia L. Cassaniti and Usha Menon

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226501543

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226501710.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 08 April 2020

Unsettling Basic States: New Directions in the Cross-Cultural Study of Emotion

Unsettling Basic States: New Directions in the Cross-Cultural Study of Emotion

Chapter:
(p.101) Six Unsettling Basic States: New Directions in the Cross-Cultural Study of Emotion
Source:
Universalism without Uniformity
Author(s):

Julia L. Cassaniti

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226501710.003.0007

There may not be basic emotional states uniformly experienced across time and space. Nevertheless, we can systematically make sense of a universal human capacity for feelings, and a potential to recognize them in each other, through an interdisciplinary perspective on componential qualities of emotional experience. In this essay Julia Cassaniti draws out such a cultural psychology approach to the study of emotional universality, highlighting a Thai Buddhist theory of emotionality based on an interpretive scheme of cultural meanings tied to a local moral causal ontology, and showing how this scheme makes sense of emotionality not at the level of discrete emotions but through locally elaborated dimensions, or components. Using a case example of the affective response to a flooded house in Northern Thailand, she argues that such a perspective allows for the study of similarity without claiming cross-cultural uniformity of emotions as natural kinds.

Keywords:   affect, emotion, Thailand, Southeast Asia, Buddhism, cultural psychology, psychological anthropology, cross-cultural psychology, ekman

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.