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Building Nature's MarketThe Business and Politics of Natural Foods$
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Laura J. Miller

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226501239

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226501406.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 27 May 2020

Cultural Change and Economic Growth

Cultural Change and Economic Growth

Assessing the Impact of a Business-Led Movement

Chapter:
(p.203) Chapter Eight Cultural Change and Economic Growth
Source:
Building Nature's Market
Author(s):

Laura J. Miller

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226501406.003.0008

This concluding chapter discusses the significance of industry having played such a leading role in the natural foods movement, and considers what this case tells us about the presence of industry in social movements more generally. It summarizes natural foods movement successes as well as those goals that have not yet been reached. It also describes the proliferation and fragmentation of advocacy groups, and argues that the natural foods industry continues to act as a binding force. The chapter discusses theories of institutionalization, but rejects arguments that posit a straightforward deradicalizing influence by industry. Instead, the chapter makes a case for focusing on the mixed consequences of growth and flexibility that come with industry participation in a movement. It is proposed that industry encourages cultural change while upholding a capitalist framework for the production and distribution of consumer goods.

Keywords:   capitalism, cultural change, deradicalization, flexibility, growth, institutionalization

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