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The Languages of ScandinaviaSeven Sisters of the North$
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Ruth H. Sanders

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226493893

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226493923.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 07 April 2020

Faroese Emerges

Faroese Emerges

Chapter:
(p.133) 6 Faroese Emerges
Source:
The Languages of Scandinavia
Author(s):

Ruth H. Sanders

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226493923.003.0007

Faroese and Icelandic began to be recognized as separate from their Old Norse mother language after the writing of the sagas (the twelfth through the fourteenth centuries), but at first they were considered as one, both called ‘Icelandic’. After the Protestant Reformation arrived in the Faroes around 1540, Danish became the primary language of the Faroes, used in government, church, and school. Faroese writings (never extensive) ceased to exist, and the spoken language retreated to the farms and fishing villages. In 1846 Venceslaus Ulricus Hammershaimb, in his work Færøsk Anthologi, rescued Faroese from anonymity and christened it det færøske sprog ‘the Faroese language’. In 1948, the Danish Folketing ‘Parliament’ granted home rule to the Faroese Islands (still part of the Kingdom of Denmark), and Faroese became the official language, Danish the first foreign language.

Keywords:   Faroese Norse, det færøske sprog, Skjaldur, Faro-Danish, V.U. Hammershaimb

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