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Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs$
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David Ikard

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226492469

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226492773.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

Santa Claus Is White and Jesus Is Too: Era(c)ing White Myths for the Health and Well-Being of Our Children

Santa Claus Is White and Jesus Is Too: Era(c)ing White Myths for the Health and Well-Being of Our Children

Chapter:
(p.109) Five Santa Claus Is White and Jesus Is Too: Era(c)ing White Myths for the Health and Well-Being of Our Children
Source:
Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs
Author(s):

David Ikard

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226492773.003.0006

This chapter investigates the effect that whitewashed religious figures, fairy tales, cartoons, and children's literature have on African American children. The chief goal is to explode the conventional notion that such images are harmless and apolitical. What I expose are the ways in which these images reproduce and reinforce white supremacist thinking. More specifically, I delineate how white supremacist ideology allows religious and mythical figures like the Christian messiah Jesus Christ and Santa Claus to emerge culturally as universal and transcendent even as they are rendered white in the public domain. I further discuss why African American parents must buck cultural norms and teach their children to reject religious figures, myths, and fairy tales that reify whiteness and white supremacy.

Keywords:   Santa Claus, Christmas, Disney movies, Jon Stewart, Jesus, Michaelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, racial intimidation, meritocracy, white supremacy

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