Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Ikard

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226492469

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226492773.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

“Only Tired I Was, Was Tired of Giving In”: Rosa Parks, Magical Negroes, and the Whitewashing of Black Struggle

“Only Tired I Was, Was Tired of Giving In”: Rosa Parks, Magical Negroes, and the Whitewashing of Black Struggle

Chapter:
(p.91) Four “Only Tired I Was, Was Tired of Giving In”: Rosa Parks, Magical Negroes, and the Whitewashing of Black Struggle
Source:
Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs
Author(s):

David Ikard

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226492773.003.0005

Focusing on Rosa Parks's attempt to set the record straight about her iconic act of civil disobedience on a Birmingham bus, this chapter engages how the magical negro trope operates to whitewash black human rights struggles and elevate white redemption narratives. Moreover, this chapter historicizes this pattern of whitewashing to show how it encourages our society to see racial progress as a natural and inevitable rather than the stuff of black organizing, strategising, protesting, resisting and even taking up arms. What becomes clear is that the magical negro trope facilitates willful white blindness and frustrates critical engagement with the sophistication, shrewdness, and brilliance of black activism and social transformation.

Keywords:   Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., slavery, Civil Rights movement, Birmingham, rugged individualism, meritocracy, counterhegemonic narratives, double consciousness, Abraham Lincoln

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.