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The Ascent of AffectGenealogy and Critique$
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Ruth Leys

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226488424

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226488738.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Where We Are Now

Chapter:
(p.351) Epilogue
Source:
The Ascent of Affect
Author(s):

Ruth Leys

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226488738.003.0009

In 2015 some of the chief scientists in the long-standing dispute over the nature of the emotions -- Fridlund, Russell, Dacher Keltner and Daniel Cordaro (the last are followers of Ekman's Basic Emotions model) -- were invited by Andrea Scarantino, editor of Emotion Researcher, the Newsletter of the International Society for Research on the Emotions, to publish online statements concerning their respective views. In addition, Scarantino posed questions to these scientists and the statements and the exchanges that ensued were also posted online. If Scarantino hoped that the debate would generate a consensus about the nature of emotion he must have been disappointed, since no such consensus emerged. The Epilogue explains why this outcome was inevitable.

Keywords:   Daniel Cordaro, core affect, Alan J. Fridlund, Dacher Keltner, multicomponential responses, psychological constructionism, James A. Russell, Andrea Scarantino, solitary expressions

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