Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The I in TeamSports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Erin C. Tarver

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226469935

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226470276.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

“Honey Badger Takes What He Wants”: Southern Collegiate Athletics and the Mascotting of Black Masculinity

“Honey Badger Takes What He Wants”: Southern Collegiate Athletics and the Mascotting of Black Masculinity

Chapter:
(p.109) 5 “Honey Badger Takes What He Wants”: Southern Collegiate Athletics and the Mascotting of Black Masculinity
Source:
The I in Team
Author(s):

Erin C. Tarver

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226470276.003.0006

This chapter examines the mascotting of young black men in southern collegiate athletics. Despite the apparent progress of racially integrated college sports in the South, this chapter argues that collegiate sports fandom in its current state—particularly in the American south—is a central mechanism in the reproduction of whiteness as a hierarchizing racial category. Moreover, because the mascotting of black male athletes depends on the racist association of blackness with hyper-masculinity, it is instrumental in reinforcing heterosexism, homophobia, and misogyny. Analyzing the examples of three prominent black stars at predominately white institutions, this chapter shows that black masculinity is often positioned by fans as at once desirable, disposable, and potentially dangerous—as both an object of fantasy, and a convenient scapegoat for the social ills to which the current organization of collegiate athletics gives rise. Yet, the mascotting and exploitation of these athletes is troubling not only because of its representation of blackness, but because it conversely reproduces whiteness as dominant, respectable, and cultured, and figures women (particularly black women) as objects of sexual exchange.

Keywords:   mascotting, black masculinity, college athletics, the American south, whiteness, hypersexuality, heterosexism, Tyrann Mathieu, Kevin Ware, Kenyan Drake

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.