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MOOCs and Their AfterlivesExperiments in Scale and Access in Higher Education$
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Elizabeth Losh

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226469317

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226469591.001.0001

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MOOCs, Second Life, and the White Man’s Burden

MOOCs, Second Life, and the White Man’s Burden

Chapter:
(p.287) 18 MOOCs, Second Life, and the White Man’s Burden
Source:
MOOCs and Their Afterlives
Author(s):

Siva Vaidhyanathan

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226469591.003.0019

MOOCs have opened up an era of unfounded hyperbole in higher education. Instead of carefully experimenting with and testing the results of Massive Open Online Courses, political and commercial forces have pushed American university leaders to rush into the widespread adoption of MOOCs via private venture. This article argues that the rollout of MOOCs should have been done by and through universities themselves, with careful deliberation and modeled study, without all they hyped-up prose about “disruptive innovation” and “revolution.” Only then could we fully grasp the limits and the potential of MOOCs.

Keywords:   virtual worlds, Coursera, disruptive innovation, marketing, hypodermic needle theory, privacy

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