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MOOCs and Their AfterlivesExperiments in Scale and Access in Higher Education$
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Elizabeth Losh

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226469317

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226469591.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 24 September 2021

Haven’t You Ever Heard of Tumblr? FemTechNet’s Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC), Pedagogical Publics, and Classroom Incivility

Haven’t You Ever Heard of Tumblr? FemTechNet’s Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC), Pedagogical Publics, and Classroom Incivility

Chapter:
(p.161) 10 Haven’t You Ever Heard of Tumblr? FemTechNet’s Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC), Pedagogical Publics, and Classroom Incivility
Source:
MOOCs and Their Afterlives
Author(s):

Jasmine Rault

T. L. Cowan

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226469591.003.0011

This chapter discusses feminist pedagogical publics in the context of social media platforms including Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook. While the existing formulation of “public pedagogies” focuses primarily on teaching that happens in public, this chapter shifts the discourse to the ways that feminist “pedagogical publics” are shaping contemporary political and social thought and participation. This shift seeks to account for teaching environments in which teaching is collective, aggregate, unstable, replaceable, and often anonymous; the public is intensely productive, regularly taking on the role of teacher, challenging, redirecting, and reconfiguring the content of the lesson; and the range of affective tones include so-called “toxic” or uncivil affects. The authors consider some ways that social justice oriented online pedagogical publics are changing the teaching environment in university classrooms. In particular, teachers are challenged by the knowledge and affective gaps between students who are and who are not participants in these online pedagogical publics. The article concludes by proposing the FemTechNet Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) as a model with potential to bridge feminist pedagogical publics between classroom and social media environments.

Keywords:   feminist pedagogy, public pedagogy, toxic affects, social justice, FemTechNet, social media

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