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The One Culture?A Conversation about Science$

Jay A. Labinger and Harry Collins

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780226467221

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226467245.001.0001

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(p.303) References References

Source:
The One Culture?
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press

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