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Beyond SurgeryInjury, Healing, and Religion at an Ethiopian Hospital$
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Anita Hannig

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226457154

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226457321.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Beyond Surgery
Author(s):

Anita Hannig

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226457321.003.0001

The introduction begins by detailing the general contours of the loss-and-salvation narrative that has been built up around obstetric fistula. Although the narrative’s core assumptions do not hold up easily to scrutiny, they open up a critical space for scholarly inquiry: How do experiences of injury and treatment for fistula play out in a specific ethnographic site, both in connection to this narrative and independently of it? Using the narrative as a springboard to a more expansive set of concerns about bodily injury, the function of hospitals, and the role of surgery as a technological imaginary, the introduction lays out the book’s primary contention: that both processes of injury and projects of healing are entangled in a range of agendas that exceed a focus on the biophysical body. Just as women’s birthing injuries pulled in a host of concerns, practices, and actors, so did the project of healing. Having spelled out the book’s principal contributions to scholarship in and beyond medical anthropology, the introduction acquaints the reader with Hamlin fistula hospitals, obstetric fistula as a medical condition, Ethiopia’s existing health infrastructure, the author’s main site of research, as well as her research methods.

Keywords:   obstetric fistula, surgery, culture, salvation, health care, narrative, women, injury, structural violence, hospital ethnography, ethnography

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