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Measuring the Subjective Well-Being of NationsNational Accounts of Time Use and Well-Being$
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Alan B. Krueger

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780226454566

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226454573.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Rejoinder

Rejoinder

Chapter:
(p.243) 9 Rejoinder
Source:
Measuring the Subjective Well-Being of Nations
Author(s):
Alan B. Krueger, Daniel Kahneman, David Schkade, Norbert Schwarz, Arthur A. Stone
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226454573.003.0010

This chapter explains several valid points about the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed method for National Time Accounting (NTA), particularly regarding the idea of measuring subjective well-being by the fraction of time people spend in an unpleasant emotional state. The assumptions underlying the proposal for NTA seem to strike a reasonable balance between measurement requirements and practicality. The U-index and related indicators can provide a useful indicator of situations that are associated with unpleasant emotional experiences and of groups that are more likely to endure emotionally unpleasant experiences. It is hoped that NTA can provide a means for tracking whether societies are spending their time in more or less enjoyable ways, which can be an input along with others to derive a picture of the progress of society.

Keywords:   National Time Accounting, NTA, subjective well-being, U-index, emotional experiences, emotional state, practicality

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